Religion as Aesthetic Creation: Ritual and Belief in William Butler Yeats and Aleister Crowley

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Title

Religion as Aesthetic Creation: Ritual and Belief in William Butler Yeats and Aleister Crowley

Description

William Butler Yeats and Aleister Crowley created literary works intending them to comprise religious systems, thus negotiating the often-conflicting roles of religion and modern art and literature. Both men credited Percy Bysshe Shelley as a major influence, and Shelley's ideas of art as religion may have shaped their pursuit to create working religions from their art. This study analyzes the beliefs, prophetic practices, myths, rituals, and invocations found in their literature, focusing particularly on Yeats's Supernatural Songs, Celtic Mysteries, and Island of Statues, and Crowley's "Philosopher's Progress," "Garden of Janus," Rites of Eleusis, and "Hymn to Pan." While anthropological definitions generally distinguish art from religion, Crowley's religion, Thelema, satisfies requirements for both categories, as Yeats's Celtic Mysteries may have done had he completed the project.

Creator

Clanton, Amy M.

Source

Clanton, A. M. (2011). Religion as aesthetic creation: Ritual and belief in william butler yeats and aleister crowley. (Order No. 3482827, University of South Florida). ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, , 176. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/911023933. (911023933).

Publisher

UMI Dissertations Publishing

Date

2019-08-21

Contributor

UMI Dissertations Publishing

Rights

Copyrighted by author.

Format

PDF

Language

English

Type

PhD Dissertation

Text Item Type Metadata

Text

Religion as Aesthetic Creation: Ritual and Belief in William Butler Yeats and Aleister Crowley
Clanton, Amy M.. University of South Florida, ProQuest, UMI Dissertations Publishing, 2011. 3482827.

William Butler Yeats and Aleister Crowley created literary works intending them to comprise religious systems, thus negotiating the often-conflicting roles of religion and modern art and literature. Both men credited Percy Bysshe Shelley as a major influence, and Shelley's ideas of art as religion may have shaped their pursuit to create working religions from their art. This study analyzes the beliefs, prophetic practices, myths, rituals, and invocations found in their literature, focusing particularly on Yeats's Supernatural Songs, Celtic Mysteries, and Island of Statues, and Crowley's "Philosopher's Progress," "Garden of Janus," Rites of Eleusis, and "Hymn to Pan." While anthropological definitions generally distinguish art from religion, Crowley's religion, Thelema, satisfies requirements for both categories, as Yeats's Celtic Mysteries may have done had he completed the project.

Original Format

Paper Document

Files

http://www.johnlcrow.com/archive/files/original/5aaf7c54d0a7ca9a58702acdb9f01914.pdf

Citation

Clanton, Amy M., “Religion as Aesthetic Creation: Ritual and Belief in William Butler Yeats and Aleister Crowley,” John L. Crow's Akashic Archive, accessed August 21, 2019, http://archive.johnlcrow.com/items/show/68.

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